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Ter Ducken

what do you make of Holtzman raising $500,000 thus far? what can we realistically read into this? how does that amount of money raised, in that period of time, rank in your recent memory?

thanks for doing this.

Cathy Donohue

I would like to see more in depth reporting on Denver issues. Although Hickenlooper's ratings are high; and he is a personally charming man, his governing abilities are lacking. I would like to hear from city employees, developers or just folks who have found a lack of direction in government leadershop.

Cathy Donohue

I would like to see more in depth reporting on Denver issues. Although Hickenlooper's ratings are high; and he is a personally charming man, his governing abilities are lacking. I would like to hear from city employees, developers or just folks who have found a lack of direction in government leadershop.

John Zabawa, President/CEO, Seniors' Resource Center

Ms. Bartels,

There is a rapidly expanding demand for services that can assist Colorado’s fragile, vulnerable and low-income older adults with community-based services. The number of older adults in Colorado is expected to grow from 560,000 now to 1.2 million by the year 2020. Seniors and their children are looking for high-quality ways to live as independently as possible, in their own homes. They want alternatives to premature entry into nursing homes.

Programs we offer at Seniors’ Resource Center include in-home care, transportation to medical appointments and grocery shopping, adult day and respite programs, home repairs to promote mobility, volunteer opportunities, and care management.

The clients of these programs benefit from the creation of an Older Coloradans Fund five years ago. In the capitol, House Bill 1100 would increase the Older Coloradans Fund from $3 million to $5 million for 2008. House Bill 1100 has passed the House. But, it is encountering stiff opposition in the Senate Appropriations Committee right now.

House Bill 1100 is significant legislation. It merits support from the Senate and Governor Ritter. If Colorado does not fund community-based programs for seniors at a higher rate, it would be a penny-wise, pound-foolish decision. Older adults would have to turn to more expensive sources of institutional care, like hospitals and nursing homes, for help, when they should be able to remain at home with dignity and enhanced quality of life.

Can you provide any thoughts about the prospects for this vital legislation? Thank you.

John Zabawa

Sharon

Hi Lynn:

I was wondering when you thought micropayments will be utilized on the Internet and what effect that will have on the newspapers and Journalism?

Time magazine had a story about a micropayment system that supposedly will enable Internet users to sign up with a password for a virtual gift card, which they can then use on different newspaper, magazine or any creative content site for a minimal fee of something like 7 cents per visit or 16 cents per visit(as opposed to getting the journalists' work for free or having to pay for a whole online subscription, like the Wall Street Journal currently requires). Supposedly, there would be a company that sells the virtual cards, which you will be able to use at any site that wants to use the system, sort of like the way a visa or MasterCard are accepted anywhere. For instance, when you go the Denver Post's site, a box would pop up and ask, "Do you want to pay 7 cents for today's paper?" And then it would ask the reader to enter his or her password. It would be just like buying a newspaper virtually.

People who publish creative content are excited about it, and I imagine the newspapers would like it because they wouldn't need to rely solely on advertising revenue.

How do you think this technology will pan out? Have you heard anything about the status of the technology and whether the DP plans to utilize it anytime soon. With all the hype about blogs it seems like Journalism is underappreciated. It's scary that many people feel that bloggers (who hide behind a nickname and aren't held accountable for what they post) can provide more truthful information than professional journalists.

I enjoyed your talk at Xcel Energy today!

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