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Ted Weverka

Your analysis of Salazar's participation in this affair is right on. Salazar is pragmatic. Some of us would rather have a Senator with principle.

With this confirmation, the Senate is telling the world that the US condones torture. There are some things on which a person shouldn't comprimise.

sparky

i find it infinitely depressing that our elected officials are somehow compelled to 'go along to get along.' t'would that some democrat would get up and tell the other side to fuck off....

sparky

i find it infinitely depressing that our elected officials are somehow compelled to 'go along to get along.' t'would that some democrat would get up and tell the other side to fuck off....

Ralph

Total losing battle. No reason to fight this one. Salazar is correct about this.

Denver

In terms of short-run political gain, Salazar's move was probably a smart one. If he follows up with a gutsy, principled political stand that doesn't get him immediate advantage, he'll be fine. But if follows this up with similar sorts of go-along to get-along actions, he may find 1) that he done no good for the Democratic Party and 2) that there'll be a primary fight when he runs for re-election.

ubikkibu

You could not be more wrong. Salazar made a choice to stand up and give the appearance of bipartisan support to a despicable nominee. This was not the correct opportunity to "buck the left-wing of his Party." Of course Gonzales will win nomination, but that in no way removes Ken's responsibility to stand against torture, or support someone who has formally declared our President above the law.

I like Ken and I'm glad he's there instead of Nighthorse Campbell, but he's off to a terrible start. I'd call his office to complain, but no one answers and "the voice mail box has not been set up yet. Goodbye."

George In Denver

Yeah, and maybe good Ol' Ken will be following in the footsteps of another Colorado ex-senator (Ol' Ben) who thought better of being a Democrat. I can't believe that Ken focused his support of Gonzales - ignoring the facts of Alberto's musings on torture and his suggestion that the President has the Constitutional authority to ignore a law passed by Congress - by singing the song of the bootstrap success of a fellow Latino. Sure, God Bless Gonzales for succeeding in an unkind world. But, Jesus, Ken, the guy's scary and if you'll cross the ailse for Gonzales, what else will you forsake the party for?

Roger Chavez

Gonzales has too much baggage; to refer to the Geneva Convention as "quaint" is too much to stomach. As a Chicano, I am embarassed by the thought that the first Latino Cabinet Member will be forever associated with condoning torture. As for Salazar this may be a good move. Why make a stand here? But I think he is off to a questionable start for a Democrat who shared the stage with Kerry in Pueblo when our hopes to defeat the Bush regime were so high.

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